Plantar Wart Symptoms – These Warts Are Easy To Detect

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Plantar wart symptoms are fairly easy to detect. However, before discussing how to recognize plantar wart symptoms, you should know a few important details about these warts so you'll know whether or not what you suspect to be a plantar wart really could be one.

Knowing how to contract plantar warts is important information. Plantar warts are actually formed by contracting the HPV virus in your feet. This is not to be confused with more widely known versions of the HPV virus. This is just one of more than a hundred different strands of HPV. It's not easily contracted through contact and it only appears on the feet. This type of HPV virus does not transfer easily from person to person as it is not easily contagious. However, it does like to live in warm, moist environments.

If you think you have plantar wart symptoms, consider where you've been recently walking around without shoes. If you've been walking barefoot through the gym, around a pool, at a resort pool area or gym, or in the shower, you could have been at risk for contracting the HPV virus.

It is very easily transmitted through the soles of your feet if you come into contact with the virus. You are only susceptible to the disease when you have dry, cracked feet, open sores or lesions in which the virus can enter your blood stream. Once inside your foot, the virus will cause you to grow a wart that may or may not be uncomfortable. Now that you know how to contract a plantar wart, you need to know which symptoms could indicate the disease is prevalent.

Plantar Wart Symptoms

One of the most common symptoms is the appearance of a wart on the soles of your feet. Of course, just because you do not see a wart on your feet does not mean that there's not one there to see. Oftentimes, warts on the bottom of your feet appear so small and fleshy they simply look like a bubble of skin or a blister. While this could very well be, it's not necessarily the case in all people.

Additionally, if you suffer from a plantar, you might notice a hard section of skin at the bottom of your foot that looks a lot like a callous. This is the place in which your wart has begun to grow but has been pushed up into your foot. This is common because the weight of your body makes it impossible for a wart to grow outward on the soles of your feet. It's common for your warts to grow up and into your foot from the pressure of your body. When this happens, the skin over the wart becomes hard and calloused, protecting the wart from the pain of being walked on with all your body weight.

If you have a plantar wart, you might also notice a few black spots that look to the size of a pinpoint on the soles of your feet. These are called wart seeds in the medical industry, but what they really consist of are clotted blood vessels. This is nothing to worry about.

While plantar warts are typically not anything you have to worry about health-wise, they can be quite inconvenient for some. This discomfort comes from having a foreign entity on the bottom of your feet that is working against your body to push out, when your body is working hard to push it back in. While it's not uncommon to experience some discomfort, it is not normal to experience outright pain.

When to Call the Doctor

When to call the doctor depends on a couple of different factors. Because plantar warts so commonly go away on their own over time, most doctors are hesitant to treat them unless you are experiencing a great deal of pain or you suffer from a health problem that causes your immune system to weaken. Treatments can cause more pain that the actual wart, and they can be a bit invasive. If your doctor is not on board with treating your wart, it's for a good reason.

If you suffer from a disease such as HIV or AIDs that affects your immune system and you suspect that you have contracted the HPV virus that has lead to a plantar wart, it's imperative that you call your doctor immediately. People with weakened immune systems are in need of treatment for plantar warts. Your doctor will be able to discuss your options for treatment with you as they depend on your complete medical history.

If you suspect you have a plantar wart and you are in good health other, it's not something you should worry about unless you are in severe pain. In this instance, it's better to contact your doctor as soon as possible.



Source by AL Jones

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